Volunteer Team Build Spotlight: Eaton Corporation

 By Devin Cowens

Eaton Corporation, an aerospace manufacturing company, has a strong partnership with Habitat for Humanity of Washington, D.C. dating back to 2005. With more than 320 employees in the District, Eaton specializes in ducting systems, metallic seals, and coupling and flanges for airplane engines.  Serving this area for more than 50 years, they have two offices in Maryland and one in Sterling, VA .

On June 29, a group of 14 employees volunteered their time on our construction site.  Prior to coming out, all employees were given a list of nonprofit organizations with which to volunteer during the week, and there was a waiting list to volunteer with Habitat. Tony Sanville, who joined Eaton less than three months ago, said “Because we are allowed to take the day off and volunteer, I chose DC Habitat because I felt like I’d be making the most difference in the community by coming here.” 

Eaton team build volunteers on June 29, 2011

 

Throughout the day, volunteers constructed hand rails for a back porch, built the interior walls of a rehab house, and tore down the floors and walls of a demo home. Michelle Davis, who’s been with Eaton for nine months, expressed an eagerness to volunteer because she wanted to learn new skills. At the end of the day, she told me it was her first time working with Habitat and that she’s looking forward to returning to the construction site.

Both DC Habitat staff and volunteer crew leaders described Eaton Corporation employee volunteers as some of the strongest and most enthusiastic they’ve ever worked with. AmeriCorps Construction Crew Leader Ben Kaplan said, “They were extremely eager to learn, which made my job much easier when explaining tasks and instructions for the day. I felt comfortable trusting the group to get through the project with minimal supervision.”

Eaton Corporation comes out three times a year, and we look forward to seeing them again this September.

DC Habitat believes that everyone deserves a house they want to call home. That's why we work to eliminate poverty housing and homelessness in the nation's capital by building (and rehabilitating) affordable, energy- and resource-efficient homes for people in need.